Bachelor of Politics, Philosophy and Economics (Dean's Scholar)

Course summary

If you are a high-achieving and motivated student, the Dean's Scholar program will give you an enriched educational experience. The program includes a member of academic staff to advise you on matters concerned with your degree, as well as an annual textbook/resource allowance, and designated study space. 

The Bachelor of Politics, Philosophy and Economics provides rigorous training in three interconnected areas that shape the world around us. You will learn to understand the complex interactions between economic and political factors that affect policy and decision-making in contexts ranging from local communities to international organisations. You will develop skills in political understanding, critical thinking, and economic analysis that are essential for careers in politics and government, entrepreneurship, international development, public service, and many other areas.

What you will study

The program of study includes core subjects in Politics, Philosophy, and Economics, plus a Major study focusing on a more extensive set of subjects within one of those three areas.

Through the study of Politics, you will learn the foundations of political theory, the impact of public policy, and the structure and history of politics in Australia. You will learn how political considerations affect international relations and the specific problems that arise in the politics of developing countries. You will also study the role of culture and media in politics, allowing you to situate your understanding in a broader social context.

Studying Philosophy will develop your skills in critical thinking and logical analysis. You will learn how distinct ways of understanding concepts such as justice, fairness, and human rights depend on different assumptions regarding knowledge, ethics, and the nature of mind and the self. You will also learn how fundamental philosophical problems relate to serious practical issues in areas such as mental health, bioethics and climate change.

Economics includes three components: macroeconomics, microeconomics, and quantitative methods. Through these, you will learn to interpret complex economic ideas and assess economic factors that arise in a wide variety of contexts. You will acquire formal skills that are essential in business and financial modelling, and you will study economic history, ensuring that your skills are informed by a broader context.

Finally, a Capstone subject integrates key components from all three disciplines into a coherent package, allowing you to apply your understanding of complex problems to real world scenarios.

Course information

Study area

Arts & Humanities, Business

Campus

Wollongong

Course Code

1871

ATAR-SR

93

IB Score

35

Duration

3 years full-time or part-time equivalent

Delivery

On Campus

Cricos

085658K

UAC Code

753116

Admission, Key dates, and Fees

A range of admission options are available for students of all ages and academic backgrounds. The procedures governing admission are defined in UOW's Admissions Procedures, and the UOW College Admissions policy.

For any specific advice or questions regarding an application, please contact the Future Students Team.

Recent Secondary Education Admission Criteria These criteria may be used to gain admission to this course for students who are currently in year 12 or have recently completed their secondary education.

Recent secondary education students can gain admission to this course via non-ATAR or ATAR-based options.

NON-ATAR ADMISSION OPTIONS With these options students may be admitted on the basis of criteria other than ATAR.

Non-ATAR admissions at UOW take an individual approach to understanding potential for academic success. Each student is assessed based on key qualities across academic readiness, motivation & passion, planning & persistence, and communication & collaboration.

Early Admission

Students may be admitted to this course via Early Admission.

ATAR-BASED ADMISSION OPTIONS With these options, students may be admitted on the basis of ATAR or ATAR plus additional criteria (e.g. an audition or individual subject results).

Guaranteed entry selection ranks

The minimum score for guaranteed entry (or for consideration if this course has limited places) is an ATAR-Selection Rank of 93 or an IB of 35. This includes the effect of adjustment factors.

Adjustment factors

Adjustment factors, such as the subjects you are studying, the area in which you live or equity and access schemes, are taken into consideration and these will be combined with your ATAR to adjust your selection rank and make it higher than your ATAR. Find out more about UOW's adjustment factors.

Other Admission Criteria

VOCATIONAL EDUCATION & TRAINING Students who have undertaken vocational education or training since leaving school.

HIGHER EDUCATION STUDY Students who have studied a University course, or completed a bridging or enabling course.

WORK & LIFE EXPERIENCE Students admitted on the basis of previous achievement other than higher education study, vocational education & training, or recent secondary education.

FEES

Commonwealth supported students are required to pay a student contribution amount towards the cost of their course. The amounts are calculated based on the subject cluster and the Equivalent Full-time Study Load (EFTSL) value of the subject. For information regarding student contribution amounts, please refer to the UOW Current Students website.

* Session fees are for one session for the year shown. Total course tuition fees shown are indicative, and are based on normal course length and progression.
These fees are subject to change from year to year. However, if you receive an offer to study at UOW, your fees will be fully confirmed at the time of your offer.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Admission to the Dean's Scholar degree is competitive.
Applicants need to have achieved the required score in a qualification equivalent to the completion of 13 years of schooling in Australia. Assessment of eligibility may also involve participation in an interview process.


ENGLISH REQUIREMENTS

The following level of English is required to gain admission to this program:

English Test

Overall Score

Reading

Writing

Listening

Speaking

IELTS Academic

6.0

6.0

6.0

5.0

5.0

TOEFL (Internet-based)

70

18

18

12

12

UOW College: English for Tertiary Studies: Pass (weighted average mark of 50 overall and minimum 50 in Academic Reading and Writing)

Other qualifications may also be considered. Full details can be found on our English Language Requirements website.


FEES

Tuition fees are reviewed annually: fees payable are dependent on the year of commencement and are subject to increase during the period of study.

Overseas Health Cover:
Overseas Health Cover (OSHC) must be purchased for the proposed duration of the student visa. For information regarding the OSHC fees applicable, please refer to the international fees website.

CAMPUS

DELIVERY METHOD

SESSION FEE*

COURSE FEE*

Wollongong

On Campus

$13,296 (2020)

$79,776 (2020)

* Session fees are for one session for the year shown. Total course tuition fees shown are indicative, and are based on normal course length and progression.
These fees are subject to change from year to year. However, if you receive an offer to study at UOW, your fees will be fully confirmed at the time of your offer.

Admission Profile


INDICATIVE ENROLMENT



STUDENT PROFILE

This table shows the breakdown of the applicant background of the student group at UOW for this course. It provides data on students that commenced undergraduate study and continued study beyond the census date at UOW in 2019.

Applicant background

2019 intake

2019 intake (%)

Higher education study Students who have studied a University course, or completed a bridging or enabling course.

-

-

Vocational education & training study Students who have undertaken vocational education or training since leaving school.

-

-

Work & life experience Students admitted on the basis of previous achievement other than higher education study, vocational education & training, or recent secondary education.

-

-

Recent secondary education

ATAR Only Students admitted only on the basis of ATAR including any applied adjustment factors.

-

-

ATAR plus additional criteria Students who were admitted on the basis of both ATAR and additional criteria (e.g. an audition or individual subject results).

-

-

Other criteria only (non-ATAR) These students were admitted on the basis of other criteria where ATAR was not a factor (e.g. UOW Early Admission).

-

-

International students All other students.

-

-

All students

-

-

< 5: Number of students is less than 5
N/A: Data not available for this item
N/P: Not published (hidden to prevent calculation of other numbers less than 5)


ATAR PROFILE

This table relates to all students selected on the basis of ATAR alone or ATAR in combination with adjustment factors. For more information on adjustment factors commonly available to applicants, see ‘ATAR-based admission’.

ATAR profile of ATAR-based offers in 2019

ATAR The unadjusted, raw ATARs for students offered a place wholly or partly on the basis of ATAR. Selection Rank The ATARs of the same student group, including the impact of adjustment factors.
Highest rank to receive an offer

-

-

Median rank to receive an offer

-

-

Lowest rank to receive an offer

-

-

< 5: Less than 5 ATAR-based offers made
N/A: Data not available for this item
N/P: Not published (less than 5 ATAR-based offers made)

More Information

For more information about UOW admission pathways, see UOW Admission Information.

Key Dates

SESSION

CAMPUS

SESSION DETAILS

2020 Autumn

Wollongong

Orientation: 25 – 27 February 2020
Session: 2 March – 25 June 2020

Applications Close
Applications are not accepted for this course; eligible candidates will be identified by an internal selection process.

2020 Spring

Wollongong

Orientation: 20 July 2020
Session: 27 July – 19 November 2020

Applications Close
Applications are not accepted for this course; eligible candidates will be identified by an internal selection process.

Course structure

(Current year structure - subject to change)

Course Learning Outcomes

Course Learning Outcomes are statements of learning achievement that are expressed in terms of what the learner is expected to know, understand and be able to do upon completion of a course. Students graduating from this course will be able to:

CLO Description
1 Identify and evaluate key methods and concepts in the academic disciplines of Politics, Philosophy and Economics
2 Demonstrate knowledge of the relationships between the disciplines of Politics, Philosophy and Economics and the points at which their key methods and concepts diverge
3 Apply the theories of each discipline to analysis of practical questions and problems
4 Communicate ideas and arguments related to Politics, Philosophy and Economics with diverse audiences and communities
5 Understand, interpret and apply qualitative and quantitative social science research methods in the investigation of political, philosophical and economics issues
6 Independently plan and execute a research or professional based project that demonstrates an understanding and critical analysis of the three disciplines of Politics, Philosophy and Economics

Course Structure

To qualify for award of the degree, the Bachelor of Politics, Philosophy and Economics (Dean's Scholar), a candidate must successfully complete at least 144 credit points, comprised of:

  1. The core requirements of the Bachelor of Politics, Philosophy and Economics  (84 credit points);
  2. At least one of the three majors for the Bachelor of Politics, Philosophy and Economics (30 credit points);
  3. PPE 302 - Dean's Scholars Politics, Phil and Econ Applied Research Project (12 credit points)
  4. Electives to bring the total number of credit points completed to 144.  

Note: In addition to PPE 302 Dean’s Scholars Politics, Philosophy and Economics Applied Research Project, meetings and events will be held throughout the degree to provide students with opportunities to meet with practitioners of the three disciplines and to build their skills and knowledge in the disciplines. 

Course Handbook

(Current year structure - subject to change)

Why choose this course

Studying Politics, Philosophy and Economics at UOW allows you to combine three vibrant areas into a program of study tailored specifically to your own interests. The combination of core subjects and electives in all three areas allows for a diverse range of specialisations, enabling you to take advantage of UOW faculty members with expertise in areas of study that are most important to you.
 
UOW faculty members in Politics, Philosophy and Economics conduct world-class research exploring topics in a wide range of areas including international aid and development, the nature of international conflict, economic history, the impact of global climate change, concepts of health and illness, and the cultural significance of technology. We have a strong commitment to developing graduates with the robust skills needed to pursue careers in a rapidly changing world.

 

Career opportunities
  • Archiving and Librarianship
  • Art & Design
  • Arts
  • Business Development & Administration
  • Community & Social Services
  • Consultancy
  • Diplomacy
  • Education
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Government Policy
  • Healthcare Policy & Management
  • Heritage Specialist
  • Historian
  • Human Resources
  • Information Technology & Design
  • Journalism
  • Social Policy
  • Translation & Interpreting
  • Legal Work
  • Marketing & Advertising
  • Media & Publishing
  • Politics
  • Production and Management
  • Tourism and Hospitality
  • Writing

 

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