Bachelor of Politics, Philosophy and Economics

Course summary

Politics engages us with choices about how to live life and how best to contribute to society. Philosophy is the study of fundamental questions in ethics, reasoning, politics and understanding. Economics is the operation of the economy at macro and micro levels. Combining all of these in the Bachelor of Politics, Philosophy and Economics provides an essential approach to understanding our communities and the international world around us, and the skills necessary for a successful career in public service or politics.

This degree will teach you to interpret complex economic ideas and understand the basis behind political organisations and policy making processes. You will gain an understanding of popular national and international movements, systems of government and ethical forms of behaviour, while learning about the political, ethical and economic perspectives in our contemporary society.

What you will study

Through the study of Politics, you'll learn about international relations, Australian politics, political theory, and the politics of developing countries, public policy, culture and media. A major in Philosophy will teach you about values, mind and self, ethics, knowledge, explanation and understanding. The Economics major is made up of three main components: macroeconomics, microeconomics, and quantitative methods. A capstone subject will allow you to bring the key components from all three disciplines into a logical understanding, and simulate real world scenarios.

Course information

Study area

Arts & Humanities, Business

Campus

Wollongong

Course Code

1870

ATAR (UAI)

75

IB Score

26-27

Duration

3 years (6 sessions) full-time, or part-time equivalent

Delivery

On Campus

Cricos

085659J

UAC Code

753115

Admission, Key dates, and Fees

Academic Requirements

Applicants need to have achieved the required score in a qualification equivalent to the completion of 13 years of schooling in Australia.

In order to succeed in your chosen course, it is assumed you have completed relevant subjects in your senior high school studies or other relevant qualifications. This is particularly important for degrees which have a strong basis in Mathematics or Science.

English Requirements

The following level of English is required to gain admission to this program:

English Test

Overall Score

Reading

Writing

Listening

Speaking

IELTS Academic

6.0

6.0

6.0

5.0

5.0

TOEFL (Internet-based)

79

18

18

16

16

UOW College: English for Tertiary Studies: Pass (weighted average mark of 50 overall and minimum 50 in Academic Reading and Writing)

Other qualifications may also be considered. Full details can be found on our English Language Requirements website.

Credit Transfer

If you can demonstrate that you have met the learning outcomes for our subjects through prior learning, such as previous tertiary or TAFE qualifications, you may be eligible for credit towards your degree. Where relevant to the UOW degree, specified credit may be given for specific subject(s); where not relevant to the degree, unspecified credit may be awarded.

Click here for more information on UOW's credit transfer arrangements.

Fees

2018 Information
Wollongong
On Campus

Session Fee: $11,928
Full Course Fee: $71,568

Tuition fees are reviewed annually: fees payable are dependent on the year of commencement and are subject to increase during the period of study.

Overseas Health Cover:
Overseas Health Cover (OSHC) must be purchased for the proposed duration of the student visa. For information regarding the OSHC fees applicable, please refer to the international fees website.

Entry Requirements

Assumed Knowledge: Any two units of English
Recommended Studies: English Advanced

EARLY ADMISSION
UOW Early Admission is how the results you’ve earned so far in Years 11 and 12 can secure you a place in a UOW degree before you sit your final exams. This program is for students currently completing their Higher School Certificate; an interstate equivalent or an International Baccalaureate in an on-shore Australian High School. For more information, and to apply for Early Admission, head to the UOW Early Admission website.

Indicative Criteria
Indicative Early Admission criteria for this degree.
The indicative criteria shows the subjects and results that we believe you need to have a good chance of performing well in this degree.

Tertiary/Secondary Studies

Applicants who achieve an appropriate score in one of the following qualifications may be considered for admission:

  • Overseas Year 12 qualification, equivalent to the Higher School Certificate in Australia.
  • A previous Australian Year 12 Higher School Certificate, ie ATAR, UAI, TER, OP, or equivalent
  • A score in the International Baccalaureate equivalent to the required ATAR for this course.
  • Australian Qualification Framework (AQF): Advanced Diploma or Diploma; Cert IV (excluding Trade Certificates) may be considered for some programs
  • A Diploma or Foundation Studies Program from a recognised private institution.
  • TAFE Tertiary Preparation Certificate (TPC)
  • Minimum record of attendance, equal to 1/6 of a bachelor degree from an approved university, provided there is no exclusion or suspension.

Mature Age

Applicants who achieve an appropriate score in one of the following qualifications will be considered for admission:

  • University Access Program (UOW College). The UAP does not provide entry to a 4-year professional degree or any of the double degree programs.
  • Special Tertiary Admissions Test (STAT) for people over 20 years of age on 1 March in the year preceding enrolment. STAT can be used to gain admission to all undergraduate courses other than Engineering and Law. If you haven't been studying for some time you may want to consider a WEA STAT Preparation Course.
  • Limited UAI (5-9 HSC units, including at least 2 units of English) for people over 20 years of age on 1 March in year preceding enrolment.

Credit Transfer

If you can demonstrate that you have met the learning outcomes for our subjects through prior learning, such as previous tertiary or TAFE qualifications, you may be eligible for credit towards your degree. Where relevant to the UOW degree, specified credit may be given for specific subject(s); where not relevant to the degree, unspecified credit may be awarded.

Click here for more information on UOW's credit transfer arrangements.

Fees

2018 Domestic Fees / Commonwealth Supported Place
Wollongong
On Campus

Commonwealth supported students are required to pay a student contribution amount towards the cost of their course. The amounts are calculated based on the subject cluster and the Equivalent Full-time Study Load (EFTSL) value of the subject. For information regarding student contribution amounts, please refer to the UOW Current Students website.

Admission information

A range of admission options are available for students of all ages and academic backgrounds. The procedures governing admission are defined in UOW’s Admissions Procedures Policy, and the UOW College Admissions policy.

For any specific advice or questions regarding an application, please contact the Future Students Team.


STARTING YOUR JOURNEY

Starting your studies at UOW means learning from some of the brightest minds on the planet. It means having the freedom and flexibility to tailor your experience, follow your passion and see where it takes you. It means belonging to a University with an international reputation for world-class research and exceptional teaching quality—benefits that will help support you in your future career.


Admission criteria


Higher education

This information is intended to provide criteria for eligibility for admission into a UOW undergraduate degree on the basis of tertiary studies. Unfortunately there is currently no detailed admission criteria to provide, so please contact the UOW Future Students Team for more information.

Vocational education & training

This information is intended to provide criteria for eligibility for admission into a UOW undergraduate degree on the basis of a prior qualification that is accredited by the Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF), such as those provided at TAFE. Unfortunately there is currently no detailed admission criteria to provide, so please contact the UOW Future Students Team for more information.

Recent secondary education

This information is intended to provide criteria for eligibility for admission into a UOW undergraduate degree on the basis of ATAR (Australian Tertiary Academic Rank) or equivalent (ENTER, International Baccalaureate (IB), QLD’s Overall Position (OP), etc.) or an Australian Year 12 equivalent overseas qualification. Unfortunately there is currently no detailed admission criteria to provide, so please contact the UOW Future Students Team for more information.

Work & life experience

This information is intended to provide criteria for eligibility for admission into a UOW undergraduate degree as a mature age student who does not have a sufficient ATAR (or Year 12 results), has not completed previous alternative study or did not finish to a Year 12 level at high school. Unfortunately there is currently no detailed admission criteria to provide, so please contact the UOW Future Students Team for more information.


Profile information

This information provides indicative enrolment and an explanation of the basis of admission of students in this course.


INDICATIVE ENROLMENT

This table is intended to show the breakdown of the student group for a course or group of related courses. Unfortunately there is currently no detailed information to provide, so please contact the UOW Future Students Team for more information.


ATAR PROFILE

This table relates to all students selected on the basis of ATAR alone or ATAR in combination with other factors. For more information on ‘bonus points’ and other ATAR-related adjustments commonly available to applicants, see ‘Points to UOW’.

ATAR PROFILE OF ATAR-BASED OFFERS IN 2016

ATAR

Selection Rank

Highest rank to receive an offer

-

-

75th percentile rank to receive an offer

-

-

Median rank to receive an offer

-

-

25th percentile rank to receive an offer

-

-

Lowest rank to receive an offer

-

-

L/N: Low numbers (less than 5 ATAR-based offers made)
N/P: Not published (less than 25 ATAR-based offers made)
Understanding ATAR profile data

ATAR refers to the unadjusted, raw ATAR profile for all students offered a place wholly or partly on the basis of ATAR.
Selection Rank figures represent the ATAR profile of the same student group but includes the impact of ATAR-related adjustments such as 'Points to UOW'.

STUDENT PROFILE

This table shows the breakdown of the applicant background of the student group at UOW for this course. It provides data on students that commenced undergraduate study and continued study beyond the census date at UOW in 2016.

APPLICANT BACKGROUND

2016 intake

2016 intake (%)

Higher education study

-

-

Vocational education & training study

-

-

Recent secondary education

Basis of admission

ATAR Only

-

-

ATAR plus additional criteria

-

-

Other criteria only (non-ATAR)

-

-

Work & life experience

-

-

International students

-

-

All students

-

-

L/N: Low numbers (number of students is less than 5)
N/A: Data not available for this item
N/P: Not published (hidden to prevent calculation of other numbers less than 5)
Understanding student profile data

Higher education study includes people who have studied a University course or completed a bridging or enabling course.
Vocational education and training (VET) study includes people who have undertaken VET study since leaving school.
ATAR only includes people admitted only on the basis of ATAR, regardless of whether this includes adjustment factors such as equity or bonus points.
ATAR plus additional criteria includes people who were admitted where both ATAR and additional criteria were considered (e.g. portfolio, audition, extra test,
early offer conditional on minimum ATAR).
Other criteria only (non-ATAR) includes people admitted on the basis of other criteria only and ATAR was not a factor (e.g. special consideration, audition alone,
schools recommendation scheme with no minimum ATAR requirement).
Work & life experience includes people admitted on the basis of previous achievement other than the above.
International student represents all other students.

MORE INFORMATION

For more information about UOW admission pathways, see UOW Admission Information.

2018 Autumn

Wollongong

Session Commences
26 February 2018

Applications Close

  • Domestic Applicants (UAC): On-time UAC applications close on 29 September.
  • Domestic Applicants (Direct): 29 September. (Late applications may be accepted where places are available.) On-time direct applicants will be advised of their application outcome by no later than 19 January 2018.
  • International applicants: One week prior to the course commencement date.

Session Details
Orientation: 20 - 22 February
Session: 26 February - 21 June

2018 Spring

Wollongong

Session Commences
23 July 2018

Applications Close

International Applicants: 1 June
Domestic Applicants: 29 June
Late applications may be considered if places are available.

Session Details
Enrolment & Orientation: 16 July 2018 (TBC)
Session: 23 July - 15 November 2018

Course structure

(Current year structure - subject to change)

Course Learning Outcomes

Students graduating from the Bachelor of Politics, Philosophy and Economics will be able to:

  1. Identify and evaluate key methods and concepts in the academic disciplines of Politics, Philosophy and Economics;
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of the relationships between the disciplines of Politics, Philosophy and Economics and the points at which their key methods and concepts diverge;
  3. Apply the theories of each discipline to analysis of practical questions and problems;
  4. Communicate ideas and arguments related to Politics, Philosophy and Economics with diverse audiences and communities;
  5. Understand, interpret and apply qualitative and quantitative social science research methods in the investigation of political, philosophical and economics issues. 

Course Structure

To qualify for the award of the degree of Bachelor of Politics, Philosophy and Economics a student must complete a total of at least 144 credit points from subjects listed in the Course Structure for the degree and other subjects as approved by the Faculty as outlined in the table below.

Students must complete: Credit Points
The core requirements of the Bachelor of Politics, Philosophy and Economics (outlined below) 90
Subjects to complete at least one of the three majors in this degree: Politics, Philosophy or Economics (outlined below) 24
Additional credit points of electives from the general schedule to bring the total number of credit points completed to 144 30
Total 144

Core Requirements of the Bachelor of Politics, Philosophy and Economics 

Note:

A number of 300 level subjects have “First offered 2018”recorded in the session of offer. This note means that these 300 level subjects have been reviewed and that the first time these new versions may be offered is 2018 for 300 level.

Subject Code Subject Name Credit Points Session(s)
Core
COMM121Statistics for Business6Autumn, Spring, Summer 2017/2018
PPE 300Politics, Philosophy and Economics Applied Research Project12Spring
Politics Core Requirements:
POL 150Government, Power and Political Systems6Autumn
POL 201Key Concepts and Thinkers in Political Theory6Autumn
POL 221Australian Politics6Spring
POL 304Power and the State6Not offered in this year
Philosophy Core Requirements:
PHIL107Introduction to Philosophy6Autumn
PHIL319Political Philosophy: Justice, Equality and Rights6Not offered in this year
Plus TWO from the following:
PHIL226Global Ethics6Spring
PHIL219Knowledge, Science and Understanding6Spring
PHIL228Theories of Emotion and Imagination6Not offered in this year
PHIL304Great Thinkers6Not offered in this year
PHIL318Narratives in Mind, Self and Psychosis6Not offered in this year
Economics Core Requirements:
ECON100Economic Essentials for Business6Autumn, Spring
ECON102Economics and Society6Autumn, Spring
ECON305Economic Policy6Spring
Plus ONE from the following:
ECON205Macroeconomic Theory and Policy6Autumn, Spring
ECON215Microeconomic Theory and Policy6Autumn

Politics

The discipline of Politics is an exciting, vibrant and constantly changing body of ideas, approaches and methods. The Politics program offers subjects in international relations, Australian politics, political theory, comparative politics, the politics of developing countries, public policy, culture and media. Students are advised to study as broadly as possible across the areas offered by the discipline.

The purpose of the major is to acquaint students with key areas of Politics as a discipline. Political study involves examining the origins and nature of consent, authority, and consensus, which underpin social order. Many factors are covered in this examination; political institutions, political economy, culture, class, gender and ethnicity. Politics can and does occur at many levels, from international relations to the nation state, from local communities to the individual. The study of politics is not just to do with politics in the here and now, but concerns itself with both the past and the future. Whether it is a country being studied, relations between countries, or a body of political ideas, politics engages us with choices about how to live life and how best to contribute to society.

Major Study

To qualify for a major study in Politics, students must complete the core requirements for Politics (24 credit points) within the BPPE and then a further 24 credit points of 200 and 300 level subjects. Subjects are to be selected from the list below, with a minimum of 12 credit points at 300 level.

Subject Code Subject Name Credit Points Session(s)
Politics Electives
POL 202Politics in the USA6Autumn
POL 204Politics and the Media6Spring
POL 305Politics Internship12Not offered in this year
POL 306Complex Peace Operations6Not offered in this year
POL 309Global Political Economy6Not offered in this year
POL 311Politics of the Middle East6Not offered in this year
POL 308The Politics of Asian Development6Not offered in this year
POL 310Twentieth Century Dictatorships6Not offered in this year
POL 326Global Inequality6Not offered in this year
POL 327Culture and Politics6Not offered in this year
POL 328Special Topics in Politics6Not offered in this year
Students may include a maximum of TWO electives from the following:
INTS121Global Politics and Power6Spring
INTS207Conflict, Peace & Security6Autumn
INTS200Model United Nations6Autumn
INTS204Global Aid and Development: Challenges and Prospects6Spring
STS 302Climate Change Policy, Possible Futures6Not offered in this year
STS 303Social Policy, Innovation & Politics6Not offered in this year

Philosophy

Philosophy engages with the most fundamental questions, and puts you into dialogue with the greatest thinkers who have ever tried to answer them. It asks: What is the good life? Is Happiness the main goal of life? How should we treat others and the environment? What makes an action morally good? How should we understand human existence? Do our lives have meaning? How does consciousness fit in nature? What is knowledge? Can we know anything with certainty? Does science aim at truth? What is life? Is artificial life possible? What is social justice? Which rights matter in a fair society? Should the rich help the poor?

By studying philosophy you will improve your analytic reasoning skills, broaden and deepen your understanding of foundational topics, and learn how to respect and value diverse points of view.  You will acquire skills in independent thinking and gain experience in analysing and carefully assessing arguments and ideas.  These are highly marketable graduate qualities, sought after by employers.

Major areas of study at UOW include: ethics; phenomenology and existentialism; metaphysics; philosophy of mind; philosophy of language; philosophy of science; political philosophy and theory of knowledge.

Major Study

For a major study in Philosophy, students must complete the core requirements for Philosophy (24 credit points) plus an additional 24 credit points of 200 and 300 level subjects. Subjects are to be selected from the table below, and the following conditions are to be met.

Conditions:

Students electing to do a major in Philosophy must complete PHIL107 (Introduction to Philosophy), PHIL218 (Ethics: Good, Bad and Evil), PHIL219 (Knowledge, Science and Understanding) and PHIL304 (Great Thinkers).

Students may have completed PHIL219 (Knowledge, Science and Understanding) and/or PHIL304 (Great Thinkers) under the core requirements for BPPE for Philosophy. Students who have not completed either or both of these subjects under the core requirements for BPPE for Philosophy will need to complete the subject(s) they have not yet undertaken as part of their major.

To meet major requirements, students must complete 24 credit points at 300 level.

Subject Code Subject Name Credit Points Session(s)
Philosophy Electives
PHIL218Ethics: Good, Bad and Evil6Autumn
PHIL235International Studies in Philosophy6Autumn, Spring
PHIL227The Meaning of Life: Absurdity and Existence6Spring
PHIL256Environmental Philosophy: Animals, Nature and Ethics6Spring
PHIL234Mind, Body and World6Autumn
PHIL320Philosophy of Health and Happiness6Not offered in this year
PHIL326Bioethics6Not offered in this year

Economics

Economics provides an understanding of the operation of the economy at macro and micro levels. These include modern business, health care, the environment, the labour market, national economic policy and international monetary issues. You will learn general principles and tools which can be applied to a wide range of issues affecting the national and international economy. You will discuss the big issues including unemployment, the level of national debt, the existence of poverty and the problems confronting developing countries. You will study the three major components of Economics:

Macroeconomics, which focuses on the way the whole economy functions, examining issues such as economic growth, unemployment and interest rates.

Microeconomics, which focuses on the behaviour of individual components of the whole economy, such as consumers, companies, trade unions, employers' associations and the various levels of government.

Quantitative Methods, which focuses on quantitative and mathematical techniques and their application to business economics.

Major Study

Students electing to do a major in Economics must complete ECON205 (Macroeconomic Theory and Policy) and ECON215 (Microeconomic Theory and Policy). Students will have completed either ECON205 or ECON215 as part of the core requirements for BPPE for Economics. As a requirement of the major, they will need to complete the subject they have not yet undertaken.

Students must complete a further 24 credit points of 200 and 300 level Economics subjects as listed below.

Subject Code Subject Name Credit Points Session(s)
Choose ONE from the following (not already taken):
ECON205Macroeconomic Theory and Policy6Autumn, Spring
ECON215Microeconomic Theory and Policy6Autumn
Plus ONE from the following:
ECON222Mathematics for Business6Autumn, Spring
ECON339Applied Financial Modelling6Spring
Plus ONE from the following:
ECON316History of Economic Thought6Spring
ECON304The Historical Foundations of the Modern Australian Economy6Autumn
Plus a further 6cp 300-level Economics subject

Dean's Scholar Degree

In January of each year, the Faculty invites applications from high achieving students to apply to transfer into the Bachelor of Politics, Philosophy and Economics (Dean's Scholar) Degree.

Selection Criteria

To be eligible to apply for a place in the Bachelor of Politics, Philosophy and Economics (Dean's Scholar) Degree, applicants would normally meet the following criteria:

  • Currently enrolled in the BPPE, BA (Course Code 702) or any other degree;
  • Full-time student;
  • Have successfully completed two full sessions of study or 8 subjects;
  • Have a WAM (weighted average mark) of at least 82.

 For more information including the full list of Dean's Scholar Degrees and how to apply online, visit the LHA Dean's Scholar website.

Course Handbook

(Current year structure - subject to change)

Why choose this course

Studying Arts and Humanities at UOW allows you to tailor your degree specifically to your interests. Our flexible options let you choose the direction your program takes, such as specialising in a political, historical, international or creative discipline. Whatever you choose, you'll have the option to also apply your skills through work experience or an internship.

At UOW, you will learn from experts who head international committees and edit journals that have worldwide circulation, who are exploring sociopolitical issues in health, science and technology, law and the environment and who research the vibrancy of language and its origins, or the cultural impact of an electronic culture.

Career opportunities
  • Archiving and Librarianship
  • Art & Design
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  • Diplomacy
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  • Government Policy
  • Healthcare Policy & Management
  • Heritage Specialist
  • Historian
  • Human Resources
  • Information Technology & Design
  • Journalism
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  • Translation & Interpreting
  • Legal Work
  • Marketing & Advertising
  • Media & Publishing
  • Politics
  • Production and Management
  • Tourism and Hospitality
  • Writing

 

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